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CAMP STREET CAFÉ

Camp Street Schedule 
Printable Schedule

Tune into the Camp Street Cafe & Store Music hour.
 Every Saturday morning at 8:30 on KIVY 92.7 FM

All shows start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise mentioned

New reservation policy at Camp Street Cafe.
Reservations will guarantee the reservation holder a seat,
but not a specific seat. Seating will be general admission,
first come first serve, with doors opening at 7:00pm


 

 

Pipp Gillette & Lloyd Wright
Saturday, October 2

 

Joni & Olivia Harms
Sunday, October 17
Doors open at 5:00 PM
Show begins at 6:00 PM

 

 

Grady Lee
Saturday, October 30

 

   
   
   

 

 

 

Pipp Gillette & Lloyd Wright
Saturday, October 2


$22.00

Pipp and his late brother Guy received the Western Heritage Award for
Outstanding Traditional Western Album of 2011 and the 2013 Western
Heritage Award for Outstanding Original Western Composition for their
performance of the Waddie Mitchell song "Trade Off.” Drawing on a
lifelong interest in Western history and music, Pipp plays traditional
cowboy music on guitar, banjo, harmonica and bones. Pipp’s first solo
CD, Singing Songs by Waddie and Pipp received the Western Heritage Award
for Outstanding Traditional Western Album of 2016. His newest CD, Pipp
Gillette with Lloyd Wright was released fall 2018.

Lloyd Wright plays dulcimer, guitar, mandolin, fiddle, banjo and is
co-founder of the Old Mill Music Festival along with his wife, April Wright

 

Joni & Olivia Harms
Sunday, October 17
Doors open at 5:00 PM
Show begins at 6:00 PM


$22.00

Olivia Harms was born Western Music royalty, but the rhinestone cowgirl stepped out on her own to craft a sound that is equal parts Bakersfield, Texas, and Nashville country. 

The daughter of Western Music Hall of Fame member Joni Harms, Olivia grew up on a 150-year-old farm
in Canby, Ore., and made her first appearance on stage when she was two days old. Her mother had labor induced so she wouldn't miss her show. Twenty-six years later, Olivia is following in her creative bootsteps.

Olivia's second album "Rhinestone Cowgirl" is available now. Produced by D. Scott Miller, the 11-song collection calls out to the cowboys, name-drops George Strait, swings through Buckaroo territory and packs plenty of twang and steel guitar. Olivia co-wrote every song. "I was going for a very traditional country vibe, but with some Bakersfield and of some country-western swing to bring back honky-tonks." Olivia explained. "I think it boiled down to very traditional '90s-style country."

Her artistic identity has been honed since she was an infant. The singer grew up performing on stages with her mother. Olivia remembers yodeling in Europe and singing "I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart" in New Zealand." When she was 6 years old, Santa Claus delivered her first guitar and sparked her love of songwriting. Ten years later, Olivia came to Nashville to record her first album. She was 16 years old, Taylor Swift was queen and Olivia was brimming with adoration for contemporary country music. It didn't take her long to remember her roots and creatively steer back to the tenets of her authentic Western sound.

In the meantime, she structured her backup plan. Since Olivia grew up on a century farm, agriculture is her second passion. She graduated college with a degree in agriculture business management. Then she dove headfirst into the music business. Olivia books shows, handles public relations, and manages social media accounts in addition to writing, recording and playing more than 120 shows a year. "I try to be a one-woman production," she said.

In 2019, Olivia was ready to head back to Music City to record her second album. She wrote songs with noted country writers including Wood Newton (The Oak Ridge Boys "Bobbie Sue," Kenny Rogers "20 Years Ago") and Dennis Morgan (Barbara Mandrell "I Was Country When Country Wasn't Cool," Ronnie Milsap "Smoky Mountain Rain.") After interviewing producers, she knew D. Scott Miller understood her vision. The pandemic forced her to reschedule recording twice, but as restrictions lifted, Olivia and her mother came to Nashville and she made the album. From her autobiographical "Gypsy" to the lighthearted "Hey There Cowboy" and the deeply personal "Goodbye," "Rhinestone Cowgirl" is Olivia Harms.

"The best thing for me to be doing is playing music about what I love and what I know and who I am," Olivia said. "That way, hopefully, my listeners can connect to it even more." These days, Olivia splits her time between Nashville and Oregon. Regardless of where she hangs her hat, she's well in touch with her Western roots. 
 
 
Joni Harms has a warm sincerity and ease to her voice... a voice that shines through on stories and melodies of a country/western way of life, making you feel you are part of the entire experience she sings about, as if she is singing only to you.   In many ways, Joni is a pioneer and torch-bearer, knowing the country lifestyle is made up of a blend of musical sounds, giving her a unique style drawing crowds, literally, around the world.

"Growing up, I learned to sing and write songs by listening to Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton, Merle Haggard and George Strait," says Harms. "I remember seeing Emmylou Harris, and, after playing a while with the famous Hot Band, she returned to the stage with just her black Gibson guitar and proved if you can truly sing, write a song and play your guitar, then you can entertain your audience all by yourself."

Although it is always special to perform with a great band, Joni held onto that challenging lesson and enjoys performing for radio stations and at various events with just her guitar, showing off that pure country voice she has been praised for since she signed her first record deal with the famed music producer Jimmy Bowen of Capitol Records in the early 1990s.  Any singer will tell you not everyone can entertain that way, but Joni is a master.

Joni Harms' musical journey continues around with globe with the release of her 13th studio album, Lucky 13, which is receiving amazing reviews.  Country Music People Magazine says..."these are some of the very best country songs of recent years and prove that Joni Harms is one of country music's most underrated writers."

There is no mistaking the fact that Joni was a Merle Haggard fan as she even wrote a tribute to him on her latest album, Lucky 13, simply titled Merle.  Joni Harms has built a career on two-stepping, toe-tapping shuffles and swing songs on her CDs.  Joni loves to write about rodeo, cowboys and the ranch way of living, but says her favorite kind of songs to write are ballads or story songs. That's why Merle is one of her favorites.  "I absolutely love it when someone tells me that a song of mine has touched them or helped them through a tough situation.  It makes me all the more certain that I am doing what I was put on this earth to do," shares Harms.

Joni's signature cowboy hat and boots are indeed more than a fashion statement.  Harms lives on a century farm in Oregon that was homesteaded by her great, great grandfather Harms in 1872.   Joni says, "This place has inspired many of my songs and I think they truly represent who I am and what is important to me."

And there is no question who Joni Harms is.  She is a tough, hard-working rancher who is also a mom with strong values with a gift for writing and performing music.  She admits sometimes it is hard juggling all of these things, but they are important to her and she wouldn't change a thing.

Joni Harms has earned multiple honors from such notable organizations as the Western Music Association and the Academy of Western Artists.   She has also performed on some of the most famous stages, including the Grand Ole Opry and New York City's Carnegie Hall.

Joni Harms continues to tour and do what she loves, saying her journey so far has been absolutely wonderful. God willing she's not going anywhere for a long time and has a lot more songs to write and sing!

 

Grady Lee
Saturday, October 30


$22.00

 

Grady was born in San Diego, California, raised in Houston, Texas, and currently lives in Marshall, Texas. Grady began playing music professionally in the 1960's, with musical influences: early rock and roll, traditional folk music, Texas singer-songwriters, and western music performers.

During his more than 50 year musical career, he worked nine years at the George Ranch Historical Park, in Richmond, Texas, as the resident cowboy singer. Grady has performed over 200 Western history educational programs, at schools all around Texas, over an eighteen year period. He also carried an original 1870's chuck wagon for these presentations. Grady performed 13 nights at the Louisiana State Fair with his chuck wagon. Grady has performed at more than fifty festival and fairs around Texas. He has performed in public venues from Beaumont to El Paso and Texarkana to Corpus Christi.

 


 
 

 

 

 

         
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