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CAMP STREET CAFÉ

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Camp Street Schedule 
Printable Schedule

Tune into the Camp Street Cafe & Store Music hour.
 Every Saturday morning at 8:30 on KIVY 92.7 FM


All shows start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise mentioned

Children 12 and under are Free
Accompanied by Adult

New reservation policy at Camp Street Cafe.
Reservations will guarantee the reservation holder a seat,
but not a specific seat. Seating will be general admission,
first come first serve, with doors opening at 7:00pm


 


Saturday, July 18
Colin Gilmore & Bonnie Whitmore



 

 

Saturday, August 1
The David Crockett
Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam

 

Friday, August 21
Mike Blakely

 

Saturday, August 22
Doug MacLeod

 


Saturday, September 19
Mikki Daniel



Thursday, October 8
Michael Martin Murphey
Two, separate performances!
7:30 - 8:30 p.m.: Show #1
8:30 - 9:00 p.m.: Clear House
9:00 - 10:00 p.m.: Show #2

 


 


Friday, November 6
Juni Fisher



 

Friday, November 13
Richard Smith & Julie Adams

 

Saturday, November 14
Hans Theessink

 

 

Saturday, October 3
The David Crockett
Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam


 

 

Saturday, October 24
World Championship Fiddler's Festiva
l

 

 


Saturday,
December 5
The David Crockett
Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam




Sunday, December 13
John Gorka
Doors open at 5:00 p.m.
Show begins at 6:00 p.m.



   

 

Thursday, December 31 Ring in the New Year!
8:00 p.m. - Midnight
$5.00

 






 


The David Crockett Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam

Saturday,
August 1

Saturday,
October 3

Saturday,
December 5

7:00pm - $2.00


Thursday, December 31 Ring in the New Year!
8:00 p.m. - Midnight
$5.00

 

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Saturday, July 18
Colin Gilmore & Bonnie Whitmore


$16.50

Colin Gilmore grew up in Lubbock, Texas, spending many nights as a child in nightclubs like Stubbs, where he witnessed songwriters like Joe Ely, Terry Allen, and his own father, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, bring the stage to life. He developed a taste for Buddy Holly, Townes Van Zandt, and bands like The Clash and The Pogues. For 14 years, Colin has been informed by these observations, writing songs and playing under his own name. Recently, he was selected to participate in an artist residency at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, where he wrote his latest material.

His second album Goodnight Lane won fans across the world and critical acclaim, including 4-star reviews in Mojo and Uncut. The songwriting style he is creating has developed at its own pace and has emphasized uniqueness and truth above immediate public response. His star quality, both in live performances and songwriting, is understated but real. And he's just getting started.

Colin's new release The Wild and Hollow marks a departure from Goodnight Lane, sonically and stylistically. The recordings took place in Austin and Chicago, under the direction of Rob Seidenberg and Tim Bennett, respectively. The album features two songs by Colin's lifelong friend Johnny Walker, of Archive War and Ignorance Park. It will features a string section by Will Taylor and Strings Attached, guest vocals by Amanda Shires, Sally Allen, Julia Klee and a host of other talents. Colin has also collaborated with his Chicago-based band on the opening track "Into My Future", which points to the way in which his travels are shaping his overall act. His tours in the US, Japan and Italy, and the crowd responses in all of them, prove that Colin has a rare gift that cuts across styles and cultures.

_____________________

Bonnie Whitmore may have a heart of gold, an outsize personality and a roof-raising laugh, but don't be fooled: her debut album has a body count. No fewer than two men die by Bonnie's own hand over the course of the record: one of them is burned alive, one the victim of a knife that, in Whitmore's own words, "just slipped." Take a look at that album cover and consider what secrets she's trying to get you to keep quiet. And then think twice before you spill 'em.

It's all part of a grand plan - one methodically designed by Whitmore – from album cover, to album content. The songs concerns themselves with the slow disintegration of a relationship, and the album's title – Embers to Ashes – is meant to represent that story's painful arc – from the first fires of young passion to the scorched ruin of heartbreak. As a killer, Whitmore's the last you'd suspect: Embers to Ashes is full of sly, spry country music, whiskey-soaked songs that recall prime Loretta Lynn and early Neko Case and, in their more uptempo moments, Miranda Lambert at her rowdiest. But be warned: those revelers carry daggers, and there's a bit of arsenic in that glass of cherry wine. As Whitmore herself puts it, "Nothing says 'go to hell' better than a uptempo, catchy song!"

Whitmore learned her way around country music early, touring at the ripe old age of 8 with her parents and her sister in a traveling roadshow cheekily titled "Daddy & the Divas." "Basically, my dad had children so he could have a band," she jokes. "He really wanted a bass player, so I learned how to play bass. My sister played the violin."

Whitmore's father had a pilot's license – an accomplishment Whitmore herself would later achieve – so he'd fly the family to their gigs at remote Texas bars and overcrowded fall festivals. And though they were a family act, Bonnie often stole the show: "As a little girl with a big voice singing 'Gold Dust Woman,' a lot of times I'd get the biggest applause."

As much as she loved playing with her family, the older she got, the more she wanted to strike out on her own. "I started to realize that I loved playing music," she says. "So when I was 16 I started writing my own songs." As her teen years progressed, Whitmore began working as a session player with other local musicians, while still continuing to perform with her family from time to time. For her first proper statement as a solo artist, she wanted to do something conceptual – something that told a story from beginning to end.

"I wanted to set up the album so it's: 'Boy meets girl, they breakup, but then there's the kind of postscript. At the end of the album, you have to deal with the lingering memory of that lost love."

Whitmore realized that vision to a striking degree. The title track is the kind of rough-and-tumble country song that would do Kathleen Edwards proud, but its rollicking rhythms conceal a sinister message: "Well, the preacher said until death to us part/ so you're gonna have to pay for this broken heart." "Tin Man" barrels forward like vintage Liz Phair, Whitmore using the classic Wizard of Oz character to pillory a heartless ex. Its lyric is built on a sly double-entendre: "Replaced by a girl named Mary who shares my middle name" (Whitmore's middle name is "Jane"). "She Walks" is a sparkling, mid-tempo number with all the ache of Lucinda Williams or Gillian Welch, while "Cotton Sheets" plays out like bright update of Mary Chapin Carpenter's "Passionate Kisses," Whitmore cannily using its central metaphor to stand in for the tension between upper and lower class.

She's just as adept on the record's softer numbers. "You Gonna Miss Me" is a slow ramble Whitmore wrote around the time she was moving from Texas for a brief stay in Tennessee. "I was really concerned about how leaving was going to be, and I think I was hopeful that I was going to be missed," she explains. "Sometimes, if I'm really emotionally involved when I'm playing a show, this song can get me to the point where I'm almost in tears."

The album was cut in a marathon two-day session in the studio, guided by the sure hand of producer Chris Masterson. "Chris produced my sister's record, Airplanes" Whitmore explains, "and it's unbelievable the things that he pulled together when we worked together. He had such great vision -– he could hear sounds that weren’t there yet. I went into the studio with the intention of doing an EP, and he pushed me to do a full album."

The gambit paid off – Embers to Ashes is full of ragged, rugged, instantly memorable country songs, a document of a relationship where passion burns hot, bright and quickly, and danger looms like a thunderstorm in the distance.

"I'm so grateful I have songwriting as an outlet, because it lets me relieve some of my darker emotions," Whitmore explains. "Instead of going and maybe being a bit destructive, I just write songs instead. I know sometimes I write angsty songs, but that’s how I get the angst out." Then she pauses and adds, with a why smile, "Kinda makes you wonder about the people who write all those happy songs!"

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Friday, August 21
Mike Blakely


$16.50

Award-winning novelist and singer/songwriter, Mike Blakely, has published 18 books released by major New York City publishers.  His last two books were co-writes: one with Willie Nelson (A Tale Out of Luck), and the most recent with Kenny Rogers, titled "What Are the Chances" (released Sept. 2013).  Mike's next release is slated for November, 2014, titled A Song To Die For.

As a performing songwriter, Mike has released 11 CDs, performed all over the U.S., and made 16 tours to Europe.  His songs have been recorded by Gary P. Nunn, Red Steagall, Flaco Jimenez and Raul Malo, john Arthur martinez, Randy Brown, Geronimo Trevino III and Johnny Rodriguez, Johnny Bush, Pauline Reese, and others.

A native Texan, Mike served in the U.S. Air Force and later earned a bachelors degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin.  He released his first novel 1988 and his first CD in 1995.  One of his co-written tunes landed on a Grammy Award-winning album by Flaco Jimenez in 1995.  Another was played on the orbiting International Space Station in 2007.

Mike is a two-time winner of Western Writers of America’s Spur Award – once for best western novel of the year, and once for best western song of the year. 

Mike spent many years touring with his dancehall band, but now plays more shows as a solo artist, or in a duo or trio configuration at listening rooms, house concerts, festivals, and private parties.  His career as a novelist leads to many non-traditional concerts at book stores, libraries, writers conferences, and book clubs.

"Having celebrated our house concert anniversary with the seventh show by Mike, we can only attest that it just keeps getting better and better!  I'll personally guarantee it to be one of the musical highlights of your life!" - Paula Reynolds, Hilltop House Concerts, Kerrville, TX.

“Blakely is a consummate artist whose superb ability to capture an audience only serves to highlight his songwriting skills... which approach brilliance.” – Buddy Case, “The Loft,” Enola, AR

"Mike helped us establish our restaurant as a major music venue in the Hill Country of Texas. He has produced a weekly concert series for us for over eight years, consistently packing the house show after show. We have been named "Best Live Music Venue" four years in a row thanks to his efforts.  He is an established talent, a huge asset to our business and a real pro." - Paul Brady, Owner of River City Grille, Marble Falls, TX.

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Saturday, August 22
Doug MacLeod


$16.50

Doug MacLeod, winner of the 2014 Blues Music Awards for Acoustic Artist Of The Year and Acoustic Album Of The Year (There's A Time), the 2013 Blues Blast Music Award for Male Artist Of The Year, and perennial Blues Music Award nominee, is a prolific singer, songwriter, engaging storyteller, and masterful guitarist born in the blues and rooted in the American tradition.

He is a traveling artist that writes and sings original songs that are based on his own life and experiences. He learned from the old masters, lived the music, survived the life and carries forward a valuable tradition. MacLeod is known for his superb songwriting, guitar wizardry, warm soulful vocals, wit and unforgettable live performances. At the heart of this is his knack for storytelling, bringing characters-from the faceless to the legendary-to strikingly real life. As a youth he overcame abuse and a crippling stutter by turning to music. After he picked up a guitar, and tried to sing - he found his voice.

While he developed his rich, soulful singing style MacLeod also worked out a unique, unorthodox and powerfully rhythmic acoustic guitar style. The rage of his turbulent youth was eventually channeled through his guitar, using his relentless right hand to pound out an insistent, churning beat to complement his intricate bottleneck and finger-style technique. MacLeod's playing landed him sideman gigs with George 'Harmonica' Smith, Big Joe Turner, Pee Wee Crayton, Eddie 'Cleanhead' Vinson, Lowell Fulson and Big Mama Thornton. Under their tutelage, he learned how to thrill and enrapture a crowd. Over 29 years, 19 studio albums, several live records, compilations, a blues guitar instructional DVD and a live performance DVD, MacLeod has consistently earned raves. His songs have been covered by many artists including Albert King, Albert Collins, Joe Louis Walker and Eva Cassidy. He has co-written songs with Dave Alvin and Coco Montoya.

MacLeod's songs have been featured in many TV movies and the hit show In the Heat of the Night. Two of his songs are on Grammy nominated albums by Albert King and Albert Collins.

From 1999 to 2004 he hosted Nothin' But The Blues, a very popular weekend blues show on Los Angeles' KLON-KKJZ. He has also been the voice for The Blues Showcase on Continental Airlines and contributed his soulful slide guitar playing to the Los Angeles opening of the August Wilson play "Gem of the Ocean". For ten years he penned "Doug's Back Porch," a regular feature column in Blues Revue Magazine in which he shared his humorous and insightful stories with thousands of readers. He won the Golden Note Award in 1997 for his AudioQuest album "You Can't Take My Blues". In 2006 Solid Air/Warner Bros. released Doug's guitar instructional DVD "101* Blues Guitar Essentials".

MacLeod signed with Reference Recordings in 2012. His new album “Exactly Like This“ will be released on March 10, 2015. In every note he performs and records, MacLeod subscribes to the rule-of-thumb learned from country bluesman Ernest Banks from Toano VA. who instilled in him to "Never play a note you don't believe", and "Never write or sing about what you don't know about."

Like the old masters who taught him, MacLeod's music expresses life and times via an intangible, elusive quality that may simply be a keen sense of what matters most. There is a philosophic and healing side to MacLeod's music and his stories that has helped others overcome the hardships of their lives.

As Pee Wee Crayton's widow Esther once told Doug, "You have a message and you'll send that message mainly to the people who don't go to church." Amen.

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Saturday, September 19
Mikki Daniel



$16.50

has lived all her life on a small ranch and is a true cowgirl from
the tips of her cowboy boots to the top of her worn out, white felt cowboy hat.

Mikki loves and lives the Western life she writes and sings about. She
is known for her ability to spin a tale (as evidenced by her original songs on
both her CD’s, “Cowgirl Swing” and “Gotta Be a Cowgirl” and her book
“Girls and Gunsmoke”), her strong rhythm guitar, and crystal clear voice and yodel.

Touted by Michael Martin Murphy as the “future of Western Music’,
she has won Western Music Association’s “Crescendo Award” and
in 2014 made history as the youngest recipient of a Wrangler Award with
her debut CD “Gotta Be a Cowgirl”. At just 18, she was a finalist in the
nominations by the Western Music Association for 2014 Western Swing
Album of the Year and by the Academy of Western Artists for 2015 Western
Album of the Year, Western Female Entertainer of the Year, and Western
Song of the Year. Whether performinga swingy, fun and toe tapping
western swing, big band tune or original song, or a soft and haunting
rendition of a familiar old cowboy song or hymn,
you can't help but love the personality, energy and engaging smile of this
young entertainer!

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Thursday, October 8

Michael Martin Murphey

Two, separate performances!
7:30 - 8:30 p.m.: Show #1

8:30 - 9:00 p.m.: Clear House

9:00 - 10:00 p.m.: Show #2


$38.50

To order tickets send a check
(made out to Camp Street Café & Store)
to:
Camp Street Café & Store
215 South 3rd Street
Crockett, Texas 75835

Please specify which show (#1 or #2)

you are attending in the memo field.


Two, separate performances!
7:30 - 8:30 p.m.: Show #1
8:30 - 9:00 p.m.: Clear House
9:00 - 10:00 p.m.: Show #2

     In the early 1970s, Rolling Stone Magazine called Michael Martin Murphey “one of the best songwriters in America.”  Since that time, Murphey has left an indelible mark on the American Music Landscape crafting and recording such iconic hits as “Wildfire,” “Carolina In The Pines”, “Geronimo’s Cadillac”, “Cowboy Logic,” “Cherokee Fiddle”, “Boy From The Country” and more.  In the process, he has topped the Pop, Country, Bluegrass and Western Music charts, earned six gold albums and multiple Grammy nominations. 

    Through all the chart-jumping and genre-busting, Murphey has remained constant to an  honest, sophisticated approach to his songwriting.  His forthcoming Red River Drifter (set for release on Red River Entertainment) is a collection that draws from a deep well of eclectic influences ranging from classical to country, blues to bluegrass, pop to western. In fact, it’s simply impossible to pigeon-hole Murphey to one specific genre. He is no more country than rock, no more bluegrass than classical. He is, rather, a true AMERICAN songwriter. 

     “What I’ve written over the years has always reflected what was influencing me at the time,” says Murphey.  “This album is a return to those days when I was influenced by everything. Right now, some really interesting , intricate melodies are coming to me.” 

     A native Texan, Murphey’s songs have always reflected his lifestyle, and are understandably seen through a Western lens, often built on outdoor themes with the sensibilities of his cowboy lifestyle. From the first notes of the bluegrass-driven “Peaceful Country,” Red River Drifter takes listeners on a journey through the broad spectrum of music Murphey absorbs while traveling from city to city — up to 200 dates a year —  from coast to coast.

     At the core of his music is a stubborn determination to be the best songwriter he can be, a focus that has led to his songs being covered by such artists as Lyle Lovett, John Denver, Kenny  Rogers, Hoyt Axton, The Monkees and more.  “I spend a lot of time on the road listening to all kinds of music,” he says.  “I grew up in Texas, the world’s number one musical crossroads where anything goes musically.  Texas has produced great artists from every genre. You can wake up and say ‘today, I think I’ll write a symphony’ and you can find an audience for it there. The same can be said about any genre in music.  Texans love music. They enjoy opera and they enjoy bluegrass.  I am a product of that, and I am the Number One fan of all types of music.”

        Red River Drifter was produced by guitar ace Pat Flynn and Ryan Murphey, who has produced Murphey’s last three albums. The majority of the songs were written while the group was working a month-long series of shows in Colorado. “We had a great place to sit on the back porch and look out at the mountains.  It was like sitting there like an eagle on a perch looking at life.”

     It is an approach that has worked well for Murphey.  According to BMI, Murphey has 5 million-performance songs — “Wildfire” (3.9 million), “Cherokee Fiddle” (1.92 million), “Carolina In The Pines” (1.65 million), “Talking To The Wrong Man” (1.21 million), “Still Takin’ Chances” (1.2) — and a total of 11 award-winning BMI songs (6 in Country and 5 in Pop).  Also, according to BMI, repeat, back to back performances of his award winning songs alone, with each song averaging 3 minutes each, would amount to 64 years of continuous airplay.

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Friday, November 6
Juni Fisher


$16.50

More than a Singer, More than a Songwriter, Juni is a horsewoman with a message.

Juni Fisher's name is synonymous with the kind of songwriting that, according to one promoter "Plumbs the depth of your soul…".

Born in the San Joaquin Valley of California, Fisher grew up in a farming family, but between school and countless singing performances with her two sisters, Juni found a way to have horses, and 4-H and FFA honors followed her through out her school years. While studying Equine Science at the College of the Sequoias in Visalia, she rode young horses for her customers, and became known as a good horse show "catch rider": she rode her way through college, with top honors at Intercollegiate and Quarter Horse shows. Meanwhile, she was earning horse show entry money singing big band standards in a dance orchestra.

In her early adult years she apprenticed with a cowhorse trainer, and trained cowhorses from snaffle bitters to bridle horses, winning her first Snaffle Bit Futurity (IARCHA) in '81, her first Bridle Horse Championship in '83 (the Monterey Classic) while working on a cow calf operation, and running a roping arena. Her bridle horses did day work on the ranch, and competed weekends. If there was a campfire gathering with music, Juni was there with her guitar, singing the songs of the west she'd learned from her father. In 1984 she moved to Santa Ynez, CA, to work for a cutting horse trainer, taking her blossoming songwriting skills with her.

A local band was quick to ask her to play rhythm guitar and sing leads and backups, and soon she was working L.A. area clubs with a country dance band, which was playing western and cowboy music. Juni's ability to ride at speed across the hills found her working as a foxhunting professional, and she accepted a one year position with a hunt club in Tennessee. Point to point racing, steeplechasing, and horse trials took the place of cowhorses, while she honed her songwriting skills among Nashville's finest.

Her first Western release,"Tumbleweed Letters" (1999) reached Monterey Cowboy Poetry and Music Festival director Gary Brown in late 2003. He shared Juni's music with other promoters and soon Juni would shift to music full time as her profession. Fisher now performs at the major festivals, and concert venues of all sizes across the US, and spends saddle time on her cutting horse, keeping her tuned up for competition.

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Friday, November 13
Richard Smith & Julie Adams


$16.50

Can you imagine a full orchestra playing in your living room? Or two lovers flirting in a symphony hall? It's a little bit of both that you get from world renowned finger­style guitarist Richard Smith and his wife, versatile cellist Julie Adams – and they serve so much more.

The combination of Richard’s fretboard fireworks and Julie’s warm tone and ly­rical style will melt your heartstrings, have your toes tapping and your jaws hanging open. Their ever growing repertoire comprises a wide variety of music from classical Bach to Beatles pop. It includes Scott Joplin Rags just like Sousa marches, Chopin, Mozart and fiddle tunes. It ranges from jazz standards to Chet Atkins and Jerry Reed and to Django Reinhardt gypsy swing, not to mention their intriguing originals. Ri­chard and Julie deliver both, lightning fast barn-burners and beautiful ballads, occa­sionally spiced with gentle and witty vocals.

Their rich artistic backgrounds led Richard and Julie to an exciting musical rendez­vous. Soon they released their duet debut “Living Out a Dream”, followed by their second album “Seems Like Old Times”. Audiences delight in the eclectic mix of Julie’s emotional depth and Richard’s flaw­less technique, when they embark on a journey through clever arrangements, swa­ping melodies, countermelodies, rhythm and bass lines, and earning them rave reviews around the world. They are truly soul mates – in life and in music!

Julie Adams is one of the most di­verse cellists on the music scene today. Raised in Dayton, Ohio, and classically trai­ned at Interlochen Center for the Arts and the Cincinnati Conservatory, she has won many competitions and played in the most diverse musical settings. She has performed with orchestras in Chicago, Columbus, Day­ton, Cincinnati and Vero Beach and also branched into folk music, playing a significant role on Glenn and Holly Yarbrough’s album “Family Portrait”. Julie then teamed up with guitarist Muriel Anderson for the duet CD “The­me for Two Friends” and toured extensively throughout the US. At home, she is a sought-after session player and has been featured on top ten albums as well as major film scores such as the soundtrack of “Bridget Jo­nes's Diary” in 2001 and Suzy Bogguss' contribution “Oh! May the red rose live al­ways” to the Grammy winning CD “Beautiful Dreamer: the songs of Stephen Foster” in 2003.

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Saturday, November 14
Hans Theessink


$16.50

ONE HELLUVA GUITARPLAYER (Bo Diddley)

Hans Theessink is an international blues treasure. He is one of the world’s pre-eminent pickers and his warm baritone expresses blues (Blues Revue, USA)

A killer picker with a magical voice (Midwest Record, USA)

A storyteller of the highest order (Billtown Blues Association, USA)

The overall feel of the music is devastating competent. (The Living Tradition, UK)

Theessink is the real deal, simply a blues master who is as good as it gets on every level. (thecountryblues.com, USA)

Theessink ist ein Meister des Understatements und er brilliert als Gitarrist; sein Spiel schafft Räume, er spielt nur wenige Töne. Aber die sitzen!. (Akustik Gitarre, D)

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Sunday, December 13
Doors open at 5:00 p.m.
Show begins at 6:00 p.m.

John Gorka


$22.00


Doors open at 5:00 p.m.
Show begins at 6:00 p.m.

bioFrom New Jersey, John Gorka is a world-renowned singer-songwriter who got his start at a neighborhood coffeehouse in eastern Pennsylvania. Though small, Godfrey Daniels was and is one of the oldest and most venerable music institutions and has long been a hangout for music lovers and aspiring musicians. In the late 1970’s, John was was one of these aspiring musicians. Although his academic coursework at Moravian College lay in Philosophy and History, music began to offer paramount enticements. Soon he found himself living in the club’s basement and acting as resident MC and sound man, encountering legendary folk troubadours like Canadian singer-songwriter Stan Rogers, Eric Andersen, Tom Paxton and Claudia Schmidt. Their brand of folk-inspired acoustic music inspired him, and before long he was performing his own songs – mostly as an opener for visiting acts. Soon he started traveling to New York City, where Jack Hardy’s legendary Fast Folk circle (a breeding ground for many a major singer-songwriter) became a powerful source of education and encouragement. Folk meccas like Texas’ Kerrville Folk Festival (where he won the New Folk Award in 1984) and Boston followed, and his stunningly soulful baritone voice and original songwriting began turning heads. Those who had at one time inspired him – Suzanne Vega, Bill Morrissey, Nanci Griffith, Christine Lavin, Shawn Colvin – had become his peers.

In 1987, the young Minnesota-based Red House Records caught wind of John’s talents and released his first album, I Know, to popular and critical acclaim. With unusual drive and focus, John hit the ground running and, when an offer came from Windham Hill’s Will Ackerman in 1989, he signed with that label’s imprint, High Street Records. He proceeded to record five albums with High Street over the next seven years: Land of the Bottom Line, Jack’s Crows, Temporary Road, Out of the Valley and Between Five and Seven. His albums and his touring (over 150 nights a year at times) brought new accolades for his craft. His rich multifaceted songs full of depth, beauty and emotion gained increasing attention from critics and audiences across the country, as well as in Europe where his tours led him through Italy, Belgium, Scotland, Ireland, Holland, Switzerland and Germany. He also started sharing tours with many notable friends—Nanci Griffith and Mary Chapin Carpenter among them. All this brought his music to an ever-widening audience. His video for the single “When She Kisses Me” found a long-term rotation on VH-1’s “Current Country,” as well as on CMT and the Nashville Network.

In 1998, after five successful recordings and seven years at Windham Hill/High Street, John felt the need for a change and decided to return to his musical roots at Red House Records. The choice was driven, in part, by the artistic integrity that the label represents in an industry where the business of music too often takes precedence. The 1998 release After Yesterday marked a decidedly different attitude towards making music for John, and his next release The Company You Keep held fast to his tradition of fine songwriting, yet moved forward down new avenues. Its fourteen songs displays John’s creative use of lyrics and attention to detail. Andy Stochansky played drums and shared production credits with John and Rob Genadek. Ani DiFranco, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Lucy Kaplansky and Patty Larkin contributed stellar guitar work and vocals to this fan favorite. Old Futures Gone was informed by his life as husband and father of two young children and also contained the colorful experience of many hard years on the road. Writing in the Margins followed in 2006 and was an engaging collection of sweet and serious songs that spanned many musical genres—folk, pop, country and soul—and featured guest vocalists Nanci Griffith, Lucy Kaplansky and Alice Peacock. Now with this, his 11th studio album, he returns to his roots with So Dark You See, his most compelling and traditional album to date.

In addition to his 11 critically acclaimed albums, John released a collector’s edition box featuring a hi-definition DVD and companion CD called The Gypsy Life. Windham Hill also released a collection of John’s greatest hits from the label called Pure John Gorka. In 2010, he also released an album with his friends and Red House label-mates Lucy Kaplansky and Eliza Gilkyson under the name Red Horse. Getting high praise from critics and fans alike, it landed on the Billboard Folk Charts and was one of the most played albums on folk radio.

Many well known artists have recorded and/or performed John Gorka songs, including Mary Chapin Carpenter, Nanci Griffith, Mary Black and Maura O’Connell. John has graced the stage of Austin City Limits, Mountain Stage, etown and has appeared on CNN. His new song “Where No Monuments Stand” is featured in the upcoming documentary Every War Has Two Losers, about activist and Oregon Poet Laureate William Stafford (1914-1993).

John Gorka lives in Minnesota and when not on the road, he enjoys spending time with his wife and children. He continues to tour, playing festivals, theaters and clubs all over North America and Europe.

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