Back to
CAMP STREET CAFÉ

MObil device chick here

Camp Street Schedule 
Printable Schedule

Tune into the Camp Street Cafe & Store Music hour.
 Every Saturday morning at 8:30 on KIVY 92.7 FM


All shows start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise mentioned

Children 12 and under are Free
Accompanied by Adult

New reservation policy at Camp Street Cafe.
Reservations will guarantee the reservation holder a seat,
but not a specific seat. Seating will be general admission,
first come first serve, with doors opening at 7:00pm


 

Saturday, April 30
Miss Devon & The Outlaw

Featuring
Hailey Sandoz




Sunday, May 1
The Ragpicker String Band
$22.00
Doors open at 5:00 p.m.
Show beings at 6:00 p.m.


 

Friday, May 13
Roy Book Binder

 

 

Friday, June 3
Dave Stamey



 

 

Friday, June 17
Albert & Gage

 

 
 

 

The David Crockett Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam

Saturday, July 2


 

 

Saturday, July 16
Spencer & Rains

 


Friday, August 12
Bernie Pearl



 

 

Friday, August 19
Doug MacLeod

 

 

  The David Crockett Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam

Saturday, September 3
Saturday, December 3
Saturday, December 31
   






 


The David Crockett Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam

Saturday, March 5
Saturday, July 2
Saturday, September 3
Saturday, December 3
Saturday, December 31


7:00pm - $2.00


back to top

 

Saturday, April 30
Miss Devon & The Outlaw

Featuring
Hailey Sandoz





$16.50

Miss Devon & the Outlaw
From Fort Worth, Texas, as the recipients of the
Western Music Association ‘Duo/Group of the Year’
for the past two years (2013 & 2014), recognized with
the 2013 New Horizon Wrangler Award,
and three-time winners of the WMA Harmony Duo competition,
Miss Devon & the Outlaw could be stirrin'
up the most dust between here and the chuckwagon camp!
Miss Devon, Academy of Western Artists
‘Western Music Female Performer of the Year’
is noted for her vintage 'sock-rhythm' guitar style,
warm 'swingtime cowgirl' vocals, and lively persona,
engaging kids and adults in her audience with a style
perfectly suited to her ‘secret’ persona as the singing voice of
Toy Story 2’s “Jessie” on the Grammy-winning Disney CD
"Woody's Roundup featuring Riders in the Sky'.
She has made appearances at Pixar Studios,the renowned
Grand Old Opry in Nashville, done shows with Radio Disney,
Riders In the Sky, Michael Martin Murphy, The Texas Playboys,
frequently pops up on Starz-Encore's "Western Channel", and RFD-TV.
When Outlaw Jessie Del joins Miss Devon on the stage, things
get more fun than puttin' socks on a rooster. According
to witnesses,this western gent is the duo’s rowdier half,
getting his nickname,as Miss Devon says,
"Because it's plumb illegal what he does with Milk Cow Blues!"
Like all outlaws, Jessie has been known to disappear
into at least a dozen alias personalities, including
his new acting role as the bartender, Jessie Banks,
on Bob Terry’s original western webseries,
SUNDOWN Western Webisode series, seen at
www.sundownwestern.com
so watch him close!
With fine classic western tenor-to baritone vocals,
and a LOT of charm, this rascal just might make a clean
getaway with yer funny bone.

back to top


The Ragpicker String Band
Sunday, May 1


$22.00
Doors open at 5:00 p.m.
Show beings at 6:00 p.m.


Mandolinist Rich DelGrosso, Guitarist Mary Flower and multi-instrumentalist Martin Grosswendt have earned steady streams of praise for their outstanding string skills. Combined, these three have earned nine Blues Music Award nominations and enjoyed rave press reviews and top festival slots all over the world. And they do strum, pick and bow up a storm on their debut album together as the Ragpicker String Band — but it's their tight trio harmonies that especially dazzle. The acoustic dream team summons the spirits of everyone from the Mississippi Sheiks and Blind Boy Fuller to Jim Kweskin and R. Crumb as their voices and fingers fly through the mists back to the golden prewar age of folk-blues.

Classics by the likes of the Mississippi Sheiks, Sleepy John Estes and Blind Willie Johnson — combined with new originals by Flower and DelGrosso — allow this virtuosically fearsome threesome to leaven their serious instrumental and vocal chops with social satire and mischievous humor. Just as Kweskin and Crumb filtered the songs and sounds of their prewar folk-blues heroes through their own modern sensibilities and considerable personalities, so do the Ragpicker String Band. Jump from a fabulously fretted, sublimely sung trip to the past like Keep Your Lamp Trimmed and Burning to a laughing lament of modern times like Google Blues and you'll find out what an uncommonly fine stew of traditional and contemporary ingredients they've cooked up. They even season it with a delectable dose of jazz via a conspicuously piano-less romp through Thelonious Monk's standard Blue Monk.

Mark Hoffman, the co-author of Moanin' at Midnight: The Life and Times of Howlin' Wolf, called DelGrosso's mandolin mastery "the best since Yank," and Yank Rachell devotees everywhere agree. Add what Mary — a two-time finalist at the National Fingerpicking Guitar Championship — and Martin ("One of the best fingerpickers I ever heard play" —David Bromberg) bring to the table and you know you're in for a string exhibition of the highest order. Add to that their irresistible harmonies and irrepressible humor and you’ve got a "side project" worthy of the front-and-center spotlight.

back to top

Friday, May 13
Roy Book Binder


$22.00

SINGER-SONGWRITER-STORYTELLING-BLUESMAN..... Roy Book Binder has been rambling around the world for the past 45 years! He gave up his Greenwich Village "pad" in the early 70's and lived in his "Tour Bus" for the next 15 years criss crossing the US and appearing at festivals throughout Canada & Europe.

Book Binder, travelled with the legendary Rev. Gary Davis in the late 60's..... The Book, recorded his first solo acoustic Blues album in the 70's, which was the first to receive 5 stars in DOWNBEAT magazine! In the late 80's 'The Book' was part of Bonnie Raitt's East Coast Tour, which included an appearance on The Grand Old Opry which led to almost 30 appearances on NASHVILLE NOW's, Ralph Emory Show! In the 90's he often appeared with JORMA KAUKONEN (who recorded 2 of Roy's songs)

Last Aug. 19th, THE GOOD BOOK, Roy's latest release of all original songs, reached #3 on AirPlayDirect's Americana charts! #1 was Guy Clark & #2 was the late Townes Van Zandt. Folkdj.org had Roy in the top 3 artists for July.

back to top

Friday, June 3
Dave Stamey


$22.00

Cowboys and Indians Magazine has called him “the Charley Russell of Western Music.
”  Western Horseman Magazine  has declared his “Vaquero Song” to be one of the greatest Western songs of all time. 
In 2010 , 2011 and 2013 True West Magazine  named  him Best Living Western Solo Musician. 
Dave Stamey has been a cowboy, a mule packer, a dude wrangler, and is now one of the most popular Western entertainers working today. 
He has been voted  Six times Entertainer of the Year,  Six times Male Performer of the Year and Five times Songwriter of the Year
 by the Western Music Association, and received the Will Rogers Award  from the Academy of Western Artists.
He’s delighted audiences in twenty three states, and finds that he prefers this to being stomped by angry horses.   

back to top

Friday, June 17
Albert & Gage



$22.00

From George Jones and Tammy Wynette to Richard and Linda Thompson, male-female duets are one of popular music's most delightful permutations. And the Austin-based duo of Christine Albert & Chris Gage easily slot right in with the best. Their vocals intertwine like two passionate lovers - the two are a couple offstage as well - and their performances are an upbeat celebration of songs and the art of singing them. Albert's honey-drenched voice is one of the best in Austin, gracing everything from a CD-length salute to her Swiss-French roots to Bluebell Ice Cream ads. The South Dakota-bred Gage is a multi-instrumental wizard who has played with Roy Clark and Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and his rich tenor complements Albert's voice like a graceful bow. Their two CDs and stage shows include everything from memorable originals to choice cover material. An evening with the two is a fun and heartwarming experience in which music truly is the food of love.     Rob Patterson   /   Houston Press by    (October, 2001)

back to top

Saturday, July 16
Spencer & Rains

$16.50

Spencer & Rains play old time music.

Tricia Spencer  is a Kansas fiddler who grew up learning the tradition of old time music from her Grandparents.  At an early age, she was perched up on some stage tapping her foot to the beat of fiddles, banjos, mandolins and guitars.  While growing up, her free time was spent traveling to festivals and fiddling contest throughout the Midwest where she learned from the likes of Pete McMahan, Cyril Stinnet, Lymon Enloe, Dwight Lamb, Amos Chase, and Lucy Pierce. Tricia is multi-instrumentalist who has studied with some of the great masters in old time and is highly sought after as a performer, dance fiddler, and instructor.

Howard Rains is a native Texas artist and fiddler from a musical and artistic family whose two obsessions are painting and playing traditional American fiddle music. Howard plays rare, old tunes learned from friends, family, mentors, and old recordings. As much known for his painting as his fiddling, Howard has painted many of great old time musicians, both living and gone.

Together, Spencer & Rains have performed and taught nationally and internationally, playing old time fiddle tunes and singing old songs in the style of their home states while also exploring other American regional styles. Both multi-instrumentalists and known for their twin fiddling, they are steeped in traditional music. Their releases “The Old Texas Fiddle Vols. I & II” reintroduce listeners to the pre-contest styles of Texas fiddling while “The Old Man and the Old Woman” shows off their vocal chops. In their unique and powerful style, Howard and Tricia are dedicated to the preservation, performance, and teaching of old time music.

 

 

back to top

Friday, August 12
Bernie Pearl


$16.50

The blues is life itself to L.A. born guitarist Bernie Pearl. A musician who has developed an unique upbeat, finger-poppin’ picking style, he studied at the elbows of blues masters such as  Sam ‘Lightnin’ Hopkins, Mance Lipscomb, Mississippi Fred MacDowell, and many more. Yet, Bernie Pearl is no hidebound traditionalist.
As music critics and aficionados have said for years, he is a craftsman who packs his songs with melodic interpretations that are new and personal each time he picks up his vintage Martin or National.
To hear him tell it, “I’m not a retro player. I’m playing real blues for right now.”
Bernie, who grew up in the Los Angeles community of Boyle Heights, took up the guitar in the 1950’s. Later, at his brother’s legendary blues showcase, the Ash Grove, he met, studied with, and often performed with greats like Hopkins, Lipscomb, and MacDowell as well as with Freddie King, Albert Collins, and Big Mama Thornton. Bernie played duets with John Lee Hooker at Gerde’s Folk City in Greenwich Village. (See a more complete list below).
“They were my teachers,” he says, “and it wasn’t just music they were teaching. If you spent time with Mance or Lightnin’
you got philosophy, history, and lessons in living”.
Armed with the teachings of those and other blues icons, Bernie raises the roof with dazzling guitar solos - acoustic and electric - and with his own Bernie Pearl Blues Band, which has backed the likes of B.B. King, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Willie Dixon, and Big Joe Turner.
A life-long blues evangelist, Bernie began broadcasting “Nothin’ But the Blues” on KPPC FM in 1968, making him L.A.’s first all-blues FM disc jockey. He went on to host the blues on KLON and KCRW from 1980-92, helping found and book the Long Beach Blues Festival along the way.
He started and ran the Big Time Blues Festival, 1993-2001.
His 15-year relationship with Louisiana blues man Harmonica Fats produced three outstanding CDs in the 1990’s, with the unplugged “Two Heads Are Better”, and “Blow, Fat Daddy, Blow”, garnering W.C. Handy (Blues Foundation) nominations.
Bernie applied his studio skills as a producer and songwriter-arranger of jazz-rocking violin pioneer
Papa John Creach’s critically-acclaimed 1992 “Papa Blues” CD (Bee Bump BBCD 03).
2007 saw Bernie as the musician/composer in a Native Voices at the Autry production of Drew Hayden Taylor’s “The Berlin Blues”. The play ran at the Wells Fargo Theater in Los Angeles, and toured the East Coast under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institute.
Bernie continues to perform solo and with his band at a variety of venues  around Southern California and beyond.
The guitarist has been featured on four CDs in the past decade: “Live at Boulevard Music” (Major Label, 2002), “Somebody Got To Do It” (Major Label, 2006), the double disc release, “Old School Blues, Acoustic/Electric” (Bee Bump Music, 2008), and the latest, critically-acclaimed“Sittin’ On the Right Side of the Blues” (Major Label, 2011). This CD was honored by the 2012 Blues Blast Music Awards with a “Best Traditional Recording” nomination. A live in-concert recording which included several newly penned Bernie Pearl originals, including the title cut.

“…Pearl’s music and voice evoke the unpretentious, truth-telling qualities of the blues. The sparse arrangements that grace this 15-song set only heighten the soulful and spiritual nature of the music. Pearl’s guitar virtuosity is evident…”

Stephen A. King, Living Blues

“…crystal clear evocations of the deepest origins of the blues,
wellsprings Bernie is impeccably schooled in… his guitar work is just stunning…”
Mark C. Tucker, Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange

“He has a crisp attack, expressive vibrato, and impeccable time. He has the big three elements of blues slide playing: syncopation, melody, and vibrato. Pearl has the ability to approach an existing song from his own point of view and make the listener think about it in a different way.”
Joel Fritz, Golden Gate (Blues Society) Grooves

“Bernie Pearl, in a word, is a master.  Thanks to him and his love of the music, this material will live for yet another generation.”
Bill Wilson, Billtown (Blues Society) Notes

Bernie has taken the bandstand with a veritable Blues Who’s Who:
Big Mama Thornton, Freddie King, Albert Collins, Johnny Shines and Big Walter Horton, Willie Dixon, Big Joe Turner, Lowell Fulson, Papa John Creach, Charles Brown, Koko Taylor, Harmonica Fats, John Lee Hooker, B.B. King with Stevie Ray Vaughan, to name some.

Bernie has appeared at many festivals:
King Biscuit Blues Festival, Long Beach Blues Festival, Chicago Blues Festival, Vancouver
Folk Festival, Poconos Blues Festival, Mississippi Valley Blues Festival, Bukka White/Aberdeen Blues Festival, Waterfront Blues Festival,

T-Bone Walker Festival, Mance Lipscomb/Navasota Blues Festival, Simi Valley Cajun/Blues Fest, Gator by the Bay Fest, Long Beach Creole Fest, Baton Rouge Blues Festival, Animas River Festival, Tall City Blues Festival, Snowy Range Music Festival, Piazza Blues, Blues Festival Tiel,  Clarksdale Juke Joint Festival, and more.

 

back to top

 

Friday, August 19
Doug MacLeod



$16.50

His best songs are slices of life that leave you wanting the rest of the pie. Sometimes laconic but never lazy, Doug MacLeod is a class act story teller. On “Serious Doin’ Woman” he hooks up with a lady in a plain cotton dress while ridin’ the dog (travelin’ on a Greyhound bus).

The ghost of Tony Joe White’s “Polk Salad Annie” infuses his guitar work as their mutual seduction moves forward at a truck stop. “Well, we got on that bus together,” he sings all slippery and whispy. “I guess you might be wonderin’ what happened on that bus. Well, that’s another song. Yeah, fellas, that’s another song.” He leaves you wanting the rest of that pie.

MacLeod recalls his lounge lizard days on “Ain’t It Rough,” where a lady with “more makeup than five drag queens in West Hollywood” rudely tells him he’s too loud, and he corrects her. “That’s Mac – Leod, acoustic bass and guitar, not loud!” She asks about his “speaker.”

"Like all great blues men, MacLeod lives his music, and the songs are not just on the tips of his fingers and tongue, they are one with his being." - Blues Music Magazine

“That’s an amplifier. We use that so we can hear ourselves while you all are enjoying your dinners, libation, conversation, and watching television.” And the way he says television captures the repugnance of the lounge lizard to the diners’ ignoring of his music.

“Ain’t It Rough” is a blues take on country artist Jerry Reed, “Vanetta” rides the strings of John Lee Hooker, and “Raylene” is Elmore James with a Robert Johnson mellow blend.

MacLeod borrows from Louis Jordan on “Rock It Till The Cows Come Home” and Duke Ellington on “You Got That Right (And That Ain’t Bad).” And his standup bass player Denny Croy’s credits include early rock and roller Freddie “Boom Boom” Cannon of “Pallisades Park” fame, while his pianist Michael Thompson has played with The Eagles.

All that said, every cut on this album is truly a MacLeod original. Like all great blues men, MacLeod lives his music, and the songs are not just on the tips of his fingers and tongue, they are one with his being.

– Don Wilcock

back to top

 



 

 

         
 Back to Top