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CAMP STREET CAFÉ

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Camp Street Schedule 
Printable Schedule

Tune into the Camp Street Cafe & Store Music hour.
 Every Saturday morning at 8:30 on KIVY 92.7 FM


All shows start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise mentioned

Children 12 and under are Free
Accompanied by Adult

New reservation policy at Camp Street Cafe.
Reservations will guarantee the reservation holder a seat,
but not a specific seat. Seating will be general admission,
first come first serve, with doors opening at 7:00pm

BYOB


 


Saturday, July 30
Greg Trooper



Friday, August 12
Bernie Pearl



Saturday August 13
Pipp Gillette

 

Friday, August 19
Doug MacLeod

 

 

  The David Crockett Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam

Saturday, September 3
Saturday, December 3
Saturday, December 31




Sunday, September 25
Kinky Friedman



 


Saturday, November 12
Diana Jones




Sunday, November 13
Bettman & Halpin


 


Saturday, January 14
Cliff Eberhardt

 

   






 


The David Crockett Old Time Music Society
Open Mic / Jam

Saturday, September 3

Saturday, December 3

Saturday, December 31


7:00pm - $2.00


 

Saturday, July 30
Greg Trooper


$16.50

It’s not surprising to learn that artists from Steve Earle to Billy Bragg are Greg Trooper fans. Trooper, A New Jersey native now based in Brooklyn, excels at character studies, painting wonderful portraits of people living through good times and bad times. His matter-of-fact delivery – as both a singer and a songwriter – bring a sense of realism to the tales that he tells. His music lives at the intersection of Memphis soul, Greenwich Village folk and Texas troubadour. As a live performer he’s been described as articulate, quick-witted, extremely musical, outrageous, compassionate and kind.

His songs have been recorded by numerous artists including: Vince Gill, Steve Earle, Billy Bragg, Robert Earl Keen, Maura O’Connell, Lucy Kaplansky, Tom Russell and Walt and Tina Wilkins. On previous albums he’s had help with harmony vocals by the likes of Emmylou Harris and Rosanne Cash.

Trooper spends more than half the year on the road playing festivals, theaters, listening rooms and house concerts.

Greg Trooper’s thirteenth album, Live At The Rock Room, is a recording of a single performance in January 2015 in Austin, TX. It features standout Texas musicians Jack Saunders on upright bass and Chip Dolan on keyboards and accordion. This collection of 14 songs delivers a cross section of Trooper’s work over the years as well as the brand new heartbreaker “Broken Man”.

 

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Friday, August 12
Bernie Pearl


$16.50

The blues is life itself to L.A. born guitarist Bernie Pearl. A musician who has developed an unique upbeat, finger-poppin’ picking style, he studied at the elbows of blues masters such as  Sam ‘Lightnin’ Hopkins, Mance Lipscomb, Mississippi Fred MacDowell, and many more. Yet, Bernie Pearl is no hidebound traditionalist.
As music critics and aficionados have said for years, he is a craftsman who packs his songs with melodic interpretations that are new and personal each time he picks up his vintage Martin or National.
To hear him tell it, “I’m not a retro player. I’m playing real blues for right now.”
Bernie, who grew up in the Los Angeles community of Boyle Heights, took up the guitar in the 1950’s. Later, at his brother’s legendary blues showcase, the Ash Grove, he met, studied with, and often performed with greats like Hopkins, Lipscomb, and MacDowell as well as with Freddie King, Albert Collins, and Big Mama Thornton. Bernie played duets with John Lee Hooker at Gerde’s Folk City in Greenwich Village. (See a more complete list below).
“They were my teachers,” he says, “and it wasn’t just music they were teaching. If you spent time with Mance or Lightnin’
you got philosophy, history, and lessons in living”.
Armed with the teachings of those and other blues icons, Bernie raises the roof with dazzling guitar solos - acoustic and electric - and with his own Bernie Pearl Blues Band, which has backed the likes of B.B. King, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Willie Dixon, and Big Joe Turner.
A life-long blues evangelist, Bernie began broadcasting “Nothin’ But the Blues” on KPPC FM in 1968, making him L.A.’s first all-blues FM disc jockey. He went on to host the blues on KLON and KCRW from 1980-92, helping found and book the Long Beach Blues Festival along the way.
He started and ran the Big Time Blues Festival, 1993-2001.
His 15-year relationship with Louisiana blues man Harmonica Fats produced three outstanding CDs in the 1990’s, with the unplugged “Two Heads Are Better”, and “Blow, Fat Daddy, Blow”, garnering W.C. Handy (Blues Foundation) nominations.
Bernie applied his studio skills as a producer and songwriter-arranger of jazz-rocking violin pioneer
Papa John Creach’s critically-acclaimed 1992 “Papa Blues” CD (Bee Bump BBCD 03).
2007 saw Bernie as the musician/composer in a Native Voices at the Autry production of Drew Hayden Taylor’s “The Berlin Blues”. The play ran at the Wells Fargo Theater in Los Angeles, and toured the East Coast under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institute.
Bernie continues to perform solo and with his band at a variety of venues  around Southern California and beyond.
The guitarist has been featured on four CDs in the past decade: “Live at Boulevard Music” (Major Label, 2002), “Somebody Got To Do It” (Major Label, 2006), the double disc release, “Old School Blues, Acoustic/Electric” (Bee Bump Music, 2008), and the latest, critically-acclaimed“Sittin’ On the Right Side of the Blues” (Major Label, 2011). This CD was honored by the 2012 Blues Blast Music Awards with a “Best Traditional Recording” nomination. A live in-concert recording which included several newly penned Bernie Pearl originals, including the title cut.

“…Pearl’s music and voice evoke the unpretentious, truth-telling qualities of the blues. The sparse arrangements that grace this 15-song set only heighten the soulful and spiritual nature of the music. Pearl’s guitar virtuosity is evident…”

Stephen A. King, Living Blues

“…crystal clear evocations of the deepest origins of the blues,
wellsprings Bernie is impeccably schooled in… his guitar work is just stunning…”
Mark C. Tucker, Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange

“He has a crisp attack, expressive vibrato, and impeccable time. He has the big three elements of blues slide playing: syncopation, melody, and vibrato. Pearl has the ability to approach an existing song from his own point of view and make the listener think about it in a different way.”
Joel Fritz, Golden Gate (Blues Society) Grooves

“Bernie Pearl, in a word, is a master.  Thanks to him and his love of the music, this material will live for yet another generation.”
Bill Wilson, Billtown (Blues Society) Notes

Bernie has taken the bandstand with a veritable Blues Who’s Who:
Big Mama Thornton, Freddie King, Albert Collins, Johnny Shines and Big Walter Horton, Willie Dixon, Big Joe Turner, Lowell Fulson, Papa John Creach, Charles Brown, Koko Taylor, Harmonica Fats, John Lee Hooker, B.B. King with Stevie Ray Vaughan, to name some.

Bernie has appeared at many festivals:
King Biscuit Blues Festival, Long Beach Blues Festival, Chicago Blues Festival, Vancouver
Folk Festival, Poconos Blues Festival, Mississippi Valley Blues Festival, Bukka White/Aberdeen Blues Festival, Waterfront Blues Festival,

T-Bone Walker Festival, Mance Lipscomb/Navasota Blues Festival, Simi Valley Cajun/Blues Fest, Gator by the Bay Fest, Long Beach Creole Fest, Baton Rouge Blues Festival, Animas River Festival, Tall City Blues Festival, Snowy Range Music Festival, Piazza Blues, Blues Festival Tiel,  Clarksdale Juke Joint Festival, and more.

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Saturday August 13
Pipp Gillette

$16.50

Pipp Gillette lives and works on the family ranch near Lovelady, Texas,
where his grandfather started raising cattle and cotton in 1912.
Pipp and his late brother Guy received the Western Heritage Award for Outstanding Traditional Western Album
of 2011 and the 2013 Western Heritage Award for Outstanding Original Western Composition for their performance of the
Waddie Mitchell song "Trade Off.” Drawing on a lifelong interest in Western history and music,
Pipp plays traditional cowboy music on guitar, banjo, harmonica and bones.
Pipp’s newest CD Singing Songs by Waddie and Pipp received the
Western Heritage Award for Outstanding Traditional Western Album of 2016.

 

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Friday, August 19
Doug MacLeod



$16.50

His best songs are slices of life that leave you wanting the rest of the pie. Sometimes laconic but never lazy, Doug MacLeod is a class act story teller. On “Serious Doin’ Woman” he hooks up with a lady in a plain cotton dress while ridin’ the dog (travelin’ on a Greyhound bus).

The ghost of Tony Joe White’s “Polk Salad Annie” infuses his guitar work as their mutual seduction moves forward at a truck stop. “Well, we got on that bus together,” he sings all slippery and whispy. “I guess you might be wonderin’ what happened on that bus. Well, that’s another song. Yeah, fellas, that’s another song.” He leaves you wanting the rest of that pie.

MacLeod recalls his lounge lizard days on “Ain’t It Rough,” where a lady with “more makeup than five drag queens in West Hollywood” rudely tells him he’s too loud, and he corrects her. “That’s Mac – Leod, acoustic bass and guitar, not loud!” She asks about his “speaker.”

"Like all great blues men, MacLeod lives his music, and the songs are not just on the tips of his fingers and tongue, they are one with his being." - Blues Music Magazine

“That’s an amplifier. We use that so we can hear ourselves while you all are enjoying your dinners, libation, conversation, and watching television.” And the way he says television captures the repugnance of the lounge lizard to the diners’ ignoring of his music.

“Ain’t It Rough” is a blues take on country artist Jerry Reed, “Vanetta” rides the strings of John Lee Hooker, and “Raylene” is Elmore James with a Robert Johnson mellow blend.

MacLeod borrows from Louis Jordan on “Rock It Till The Cows Come Home” and Duke Ellington on “You Got That Right (And That Ain’t Bad).” And his standup bass player Denny Croy’s credits include early rock and roller Freddie “Boom Boom” Cannon of “Pallisades Park” fame, while his pianist Michael Thompson has played with The Eagles.

All that said, every cut on this album is truly a MacLeod original. Like all great blues men, MacLeod lives his music, and the songs are not just on the tips of his fingers and tongue, they are one with his being.
Don Wilcock

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Sunday, September 25
Kinky Friedman

Doors Open at 5:00 p.m.
Show Begins at 6:00 p.m.


$33.00
Doors Open at 5:00 p.m.
Show Begins at 6:00 p.m.

For advance reservations, please send a check to:
Camp Street Café & Store
215 South 3rd Street
Crockett, TX 75835

Who else could have written a country song about the Holocaust ("Ride 'Em Jewboy"), or about a human being kept in a cage as part of a circus ("Wild Man from Borneo")? Outrageous and irreverent but nearly always thought-provoking, Kinky Friedman wrote and performed satirical country songs during the 1970s and has been hailed the Frank Zappa of country music. The son of a University of Texas professor who raised his children on the family ranch, Rio Duckworth, he was born Richard F.
Friedman. He studied psychology at Texas and founded his first band while there. However, King Arthur & the Carrots -- a group that poked fun at surf music -- recorded only one single in 1966. After graduation, Friedman served three years in the Peace Corps; he was stationed in Borneo, where he was an agricultural extension worker.

By 1971 he had founded his second band, Kinky Friedman & the Texas Jewboys. In keeping with the group's satirical songs, each member had a deliberately politically incorrect name: they called themselves Little Jewford, Big Nig, Panama Red, Rainbow Colors, and Snakebite Jacobs.
Friedman got his break in 1973 thanks to Commander Cody, who contacted Vanguard Music on behalf of the acerbic young performer. That was the year he and his group made their debut album, Sold American, featuring John Hartford and Tompall Glaser. The title track, a bitter tale of a forgotten country singer dying an alcoholic death, barely made it onto the charts, but Friedman did attract enough attention to be invited to the Grand Ole Opry. In 1974, he recorded an eponymously titled album for ABC Records. Produced by Los Angeles pop helmsman Steve Barri, the album dissolved whatever pure country listenership Friedman might have had but delighted his growing core of fans with satirical pieces such as his response to anti-Semitism, "They Ain't Making Jews Like Jesus Anymore."
Along with the satires, Friedman offered quieter sketches of American hard luck such as "Rapid City, South Dakota." In the mid-'70s, Friedman and his band began touring with Bob Dylan & the Rolling Thunder Revue.
In 1976 he made his third album, Lasso from El Paso, featuring Dylan and Eric Clapton. The Texas Jewboys disbanded three years later, and Friedman moved to New York, where he often appeared at the Lone Star Cafe. In 1983, he released Under the Double Ego for Sunrise Records.

After that, Friedman turned primarily toward writing, although he continued to make occasional nightclub appearances. He has written for Rolling Stone and Texas Monthly magazines and, most famously, has become a writer of unique and outrageous mystery novels such as Greenwich Killing Time, A Case of Lone Star, and The Mile High Club. Equal parts whimsy and metaphysics, the books blur fiction and reality. They feature a Jewish country singer turned Greenwich Village private eye named Kinky Friedman, who sometimes returns to his native Texas; other characters are drawn from Friedman's circle of friends in both New York and Texas.
Many of Friedman's songs of the '70s and early '80s were collected on two CD compilations, Old Testaments & New Revelations (1994) and From One Good American to Another (1995). In 1999, the likes of Willie Nelson, Tom Waits, and Lyle Lovett covered Friedman's music on the tribute album Pearls in the Snow: The Songs of Kinky Friedman, and a second tribute volume was planned. In 2003 Friedman appeared in a nude, cigar-smoking triplicate on the cover of the Dallas Observer magazine, in a parody of the Dixie Chicks' nude Entertainment Weekly pose of that year. Vanguard released a 30th anniversary edition of Sold American (which included a couple of bonus tracks) in 2003. A previously unreleased 1973 live studio concert called Mayhem Aforethought appeared in June of 2005, followed by the compilation They Ain't Making Jews Like Jesus Anymore later that October. An Austin City Limits appearance from
1975 that was deemed unfit to air finally saw the light of day thanks to New West Records' 2007 release of Live from Austin, TX. In 2015, Friedman returned with his first proper studio album since 1976's landmark Lasso From El Paso. Released by Avenue A Records, The Loneliest Man I Ever Met features a number of new originals, along with covers by Tom Waits, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, and Willie Nelson, who also guest on the album. ~ Sandra Brennan & James Manheim, Rovi

 

 

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Saturday, November 12
Diana Jones


$16.50

Diana Jones is an award-winning singer-songwriter based in New York and Nashville. She grew up in the Northeast with no art or music in her home, the adopted daughter of a chemical engineer. During her childhood and adolescence, she felt an almost mystical, seemingly inexplicable attraction to rural Southern music, but it wasn’t until her late 20s, when she located her birth family in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains in east Tennessee, that her deep affinity for traditional folk and Appalachian music began to make sense. Her 2006 recording, My Remembrance of You, earned her a nomination as Best Emerging Artist at the Folk Alliance Awards, leading to tours with Richard Thompson and Mary Gauthier, appearances at folk festivals on both sides of the Atlantic, and covers of her songs by Gretchen Peters and Joan Baez. Her next recordings, Better Times Will Come (2009) and High Atmosphere (2011), established Diana’s reputation as one of the premier artists in the folk music/Americana world. Her latest release, Museum of Appalachia Recordings (2013) was released in the UK and EU in July by Proper Records and in the US by Goldmine Records. She maintains an active touring schedule in Europe, U.K. and Ireland, and the United States.
Diana has performed and toured with Nanci Griffith, Richard Thompson, Steve Earle, Mary Gauthier, Ralph Stanley, and Janis Ian. In addition to her musical career, Diana is an accomplished portrait artist and is currently at work on a memoir.

 

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Sunday, November 13
Bettman & Halpin


$22.00
Doors Open at 5:00 p.m.
Show Begins at 6:00 p.m.

Bettman & Halpin are fast earning a reputation for hypnotizing performances filled with irresistible lyrics, transcendent harmonies and roof-raising instrumentals. They have twice been a featured act at the Walnut Valley Festival in Winfield, KS along with musical heroes Byron Berline, Michael Martin Murphy w/ Pat Flynn, and Tommy Emmanuel. Their music creates a fully acoustic, delightfully eclectic sound far greater than the sum of its parts: taking the listener from up-tempo down home fiddlin’, to soulful sorrowful ballads, to super hooky folk/pop with catchy melodies and lyrics that will stick with you long after the concert is over. Touring together since 2008, Bettman & Halpin have been recognized in various Regional and National competitions, including:
    •Grand Prize Winners in the So Cal Live Acoustic Music Competition
    •Winners in Southern California’s Topanga Banjo / Fiddle Contest
    •Music Connection’s Top 25 New Music Critiques
    •Their 2 CDs have received national and international radio play along with critical acclaim, both reaching the top 10 on the National Folk DJ chart.

 

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Saturday, January 14
Cliff Eberhardt


$16.50

Cliff Eberhardt knew by age seven that he was going to be a singer and songwriter. Growing up in Berwyn, Pennsylvania, he and his brothers sang together and their parents played instruments. His dad introduced him to the guitar and he quickly taught himself to play. Fortunate enough to live close to the Main Point (one of the best folk clubs on the East Coast), he cut his teeth listening to the likes of James Taylor, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, Bonnie Raitt, and Mississippi John Hurt — receiving an early and impressive tutorial in acoustic music. At the same time, he was also listening to great pop songwriters like Cole Porter, the Gershwins, and Rodgers and Hart, which explain his penchant for great melodies and clever lyrical twists.

At fifteen, Cliff and his brother Geoff began touring as an acoustic duo, playing the Eastern club circuit until Cliff turned twenty-one and moved to Carbondale, Illinois. There he found space to develop his own voice within a vibrant and supportive music scene that included Shawn Colvin. After a couple of years there and a short stay in Colorado, Cliff moved to New York in 1978. Because the clubs were great (the Bitter End, the Speakeasy, Kenny's Castaway, Folk City) and the company amazing (John Gorka, Suzanne Vega, Lucy Kaplansky, Julie Gold, Steve Forbert, Christine Lavin, and Shawn Colvin), New York was an ideal musician's boot camp. Though he put in long hours as a taxi driver, Cliff worked steadily on his music throughout the 80's, doing solo gigs and studio work, and playing guitar on the road with Richie Havens, Melanie and others. Singing advertising jingles for products like Coke, Miller Beer and Chevrolet ("The Heartbeat of America" campaign) allowed him to devote more time to his songwriting.

In 1990 Cliff's song "My Father's Shoes," appeared on Windham Hill's Legacy collection, leading to a deal with the label. They released Cliff's first album, The Long Road (1990), a work featuring a duet with Richie Havens. The critical response to this debut was outstanding (The Philadelphia Inquirer called the album a "repeatedly astounding collection"). He followed with two more records on Windham Hill before releasing 12 Songs of Good and Evil (1997) on Red House Records, which stemmed from a chance meeting with Red House founder Bob Feldman at John Gorka's wedding. Cliff recorded two more albums before his critically acclaimed The High Above and the Down Below, named the #5 album of 2007 by USA Today. Produced by legendary musician and Red House Records president Eric Peltoniemi, it was recorded in Minneapolis with noted jazz players Gordy Johnson, J. T. Bates and Rich Dworsky and was his first album after spending several years recovering from a car accident.

With a new lease on life and a fresh batch of songs, Cliff embarked on what has turned out to be an artistic renaissance. Recorded in the Texas Hill Country, Cliff's 2009 album 500 Miles: The Blue Rock Sessions may be his finest to date. An intimate album of powerful originals and unique covers, it features a reworking of his hit "The Long Road," a song made more poignant after nearly two decades of touring and recording. Long one of the most respected songwriters on the club scene, his peers often mine his catalog for themselves. Cliff's song "Memphis"
was included on Cry Cry Cry, an album of collaborative covers by the "folk supergroup" of the same name (comprised of Dar Williams, Lucy Kaplansky and Richard Shindell). Other performers who have recorded his songs include Richie Havens, Shawn Colvin, Russ Taff and Buffy Sainte Marie. A collection of his songs has been published in The Cliff Eberhardt Songbook (Cherry Lane Publishing).

In 2011, Cliff got a phone call from the Folger Theatre and Shakespeare Library in Washington DC. They had been listening to his song, "That Kind of Love" along with director Aaron Posner and got the brilliant idea to hire Cliff to write original songs for the Shakespeare classic "The Taming of the Shrew". It would be set in the old West - Deadwood style - and Cliff would be cast as the blind but wise old saloon singer bookending scenes with his poignant songs and guitar phrases. The play was a huge success and won much critical acclaim across town and 7 weeks of solid sold-out shows in the Spring of 2012.  In 2013, Cliff was awarded a coveted Helen Hayes Award for Sound Design and the cast won for Best Ensemble. Some of the songs on Shrew Songs are from Cliff's past work and some are brand new. The stripped down production enhances the immediate intimacy of Cliff's songwriting. You don't have to have seen the play to love this record! It's available for sale now only through this website or at Cliff's shows.



 

 

         
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